Our blogs about
America's Wars
War on Iraq
War on Drugs
War on Afghanistan
War on Columbia
War on Philippines
War on Venezuela

MORE
Matrix Masters
Blogs
World Events
Katrina's Aftermath
US News
Bush Crime Family News
Science & Health
Earth News

Free Speech
News from Africa
News from Palestine
Bill of Rights Under Attack



Lorenzo's
Random Musings

. . . about Chaos,
Reason, and Hope

 

Al Jazeera (English)
    Baghdad Burning Blog
(by Riverbend, an Iraqi civilian girl)
            Dahr Jamail's Blog from Baghdad
                Imad Khadduri's blog "Free Iraq" (scroll down for English version)

Iraqi Civilian Deaths ... caused by Bush's unprovoked war


Google
This site Web
 War on Iraq Archives    War on Iraq [Home]
 
The White Death: U.S. Using Chemical WMD on Iraqi Civilians
WMD usde by U.S. troops(Chris Floyd, uruknet.info, November 11, 2005)
Using filmed and photographic evidence, eyewitness accounts and the direct testimony of U.S. soldiers who took part in the attacks, the documentary -- "Fallujah: The Hidden Massacre" -- catalogs the American use of white phosphorus shells and a new, "improved" form of napalm that turned human beings into "caramelized" fossils, with their skin dissolved and turned to leather on their bones. The film was produced by RAI, the Italian state network run by a government that backed the war. . . . Vivid images show civilians, including women and children, who had been burned alive in their homes, even in their beds. This illegal use of chemical weapons -- at the order of the Bushist brass -- and the killing of civilians are confirmed by former U.S. soldiers interviewed on camera. "I heard the order to pay attention because they were going to use white phosphorus on Fallujah," said one soldier, quoted in The Independent. "In military jargon, it's known as Willy Pete. Phosphorus burns bodies; in fact it melts the flesh all the way down to the bone. ... I saw the burned bodies of women and children. Phosphorus explodes and forms a cloud. Anyone within a radius of 150 meters is done for." . . . Earlier this year, as reported here on March 18, a medical team sent to Fallujah by the Bush-backed Iraqi interim government issued its findings at a news conference in Baghdad. The briefing, by Health Ministry investigator Dr. Khalid ash-Shaykhli, was attended by more than 20 major U.S. and international news outlets. Not a single one of these bastions of a free and vigorous press reported on the event. Only a few small venues -- such as the International Labor Communications Association -- brought word of the extraordinary revelations to English-speaking audiences. . . . Yet this highly credible, pro-American official of a pro-occupation government confirmed, through medical examinations and the eyewitness testimony of survivors -- including many civilians who had opposed the heavy-handed insurgent presence in the town -- that "burning chemicals" had been used in the attack, in direct violation of international and U.S. law. "All forms of nature were wiped out" by the substances unleashed in the assault, including animals that had been killed by gas or chemical fire, said ash-Shaykhli. But apparently this kind of thing is not considered news anymore by the corporate gatekeepers of media "truth." . . . ash-Shaykhli's findings were buttressed by direct testimony from U.S. Marines filing "after-action reports" on web sites for military enthusiasts back home. There, fresh from the battle, soldiers talked openly of the routine use of Willy Pete, propane bombs and "jellied gasoline" (napalm) in tactical assaults in Fallujah. . . . Although there are indeed many white bombs bursting in air to bathe the city in unnatural light, the film clearly shows other phosphorus shells raining all the way to the ground, where they explode in fury throughout residential areas and spread their caramelizing clouds. As Fallujah biologist Mohamed Tareq says in the film: "A rain of fire fell on the city, the people struck by this multicolored substance started to burn, we found people dead with strange wounds, the bodies burned but the clothes intact." . . . The slaughter in Fallujah was a microcosm of the entire misbegotten enterprise launched by those two eminent Christian statesmen, U.S. President George W. Bush and British Prime Minister Tony Blair: a brutal act of collective punishment for defying the imperial will, a high-tech turkey shoot that mowed down the just and unjust alike, an idiotic strategic blunder that has exacerbated the violence and hatred it was meant to quell. The vicious overkill of the Fallujah attack -- where an estimated 1,200 civilians died while almost all of the targeted insurgents slipped away beforehand -- alienated large swaths of previously neutral Iraqis and spurred many to join the resistance. It further entangled the United States and Britain in a putrid swamp of war crime, state terrorism and atrocity, dragging them deeper into a moral equivalency with the murderous extremists whom the Christian leaders so loudly condemn.
. . . Read more!

posted by Lorenzo 10:57 AM

 
At Last, A True American Hero Speaks Up
For Immediate Release, November 17, 2005, The Honorable John P. Murtha, Member of U.S. House of Representatives

The war in Iraq is not going as advertised. It is a flawed policy wrapped in illusion. The American public is way ahead of us. The United States and coalition troops have done all they can in Iraq, but it is time for a change in direction. Our military is suffering. The future of our country is at risk. We can not continue on the present course. It is evident that continued military action in Iraq is not in the best interest of the United States of America, the Iraqi people or the Persian Gulf Region. . . . General Casey said in a September 2005 Hearing, "the perception of occupation in Iraq is a major driving force behind the insurgency. General Abizaid said on the same date, "Reducing the size and visibility of the coalition forces in Iraq is a part of our counterinsurgency strategy." . . . The main reason for going to war has been discredited. . . . We spend more money on Intelligence than all the countries in the world together, and more on Intelligence than most countries GDP. But the intelligence concerning Iraq was wrong. It is not a world intelligence failure. It is a U.S. intelligence failure and the way that intelligence was misused. . . . I have been visiting our wounded troops at Bethesda and Walter Reed hospitals almost every week since the beginning of the War. And what demoralizes them is going to war with not enough troops and equipment to make the transition to peace; the devastation caused by IEDs; being deployed to Iraq when their homes have been ravaged by hurricanes; being on their second or third deployment and leaving their families behind without a network of support. . . . The threat posed by terrorism is real, but we have other threats that cannot be ignored. We must be prepared to face all threats. The future of our military is at risk. Our military and their families are stretched thin. Many say that the Army is broken. Some of our troops are on their third deployment. Recruitment is down, even as our military has lowered its standards. Defense budgets are being cut. Personnel costs are skyrocketing, particularly in health care. Choices will have to be made. We can not allow promises we have made to our military families in terms of service benefits, in terms of their health care, to be negotiated away. Procurement programs that ensure our military dominance cannot be negotiated away. We must be prepared. The war in Iraq has caused huge shortfalls at our bases in the U.S. Much of our ground equipment is worn out and in need of either serious overhaul or replacement. . . . This is the first prolonged war we have fought with three years of tax cuts, without full mobilization of American industry and without a draft. The burden of this war has not been shared equally; the military and their families are shouldering this burden. . . Our military has been fighting a war in Iraq for over two and a half years. Our military has accomplished its mission and done its duty. Our military captured Saddam Hussein, and captured or killed his closest associates. But the war continues to intensify. Deaths and injuries are growing, with over 2,079 confirmed American deaths. Over 15,500 have been seriously injured and it is estimated that over 50,000 will suffer from battle fatigue. There have been reports of at least 30,000 Iraqi civilian deaths. . . . And most importantly, insurgent incidents have increased from about 150 per week to over 700 in the last year. Instead of attacks going down over time and with the addition of more troops, attacks have grown dramatically. Since the revelations at Abu Ghraib, American casualties have doubled. An annual State Department report in 2004 indicated a sharp increase in global terrorism. . . . I said over a year ago, and now the military and the Administration agrees, Iraq can not be won "militarily." I said two years ago, the key to progress in Iraq is to Iraqitize, Internationalize and Energize. I believe the same today. But I have concluded that the presence of U.S. troops in Iraq is impeding this progress. . . . Our troops have become the primary target of the insurgency. They are united against U.S. forces and we have become a catalyst for violence. U.S. troops are the common enemy of the Sunnis, Saddamists and foreign jihadists. I believe with a U.S. troop redeployment, the Iraqi security forces will be incentivized to take control. A poll recently conducted shows that over 80% of Iraqis are strongly opposed to the presence of coalition troops, and about 45% of the Iraqi population believe attacks against American troops are justified. I believe we need to turn Iraq over to the Iraqis. . . . I believe before the Iraqi elections, scheduled for mid December, the Iraqi people and the emerging government must be put on notice that the United States will immediately redeploy. All of Iraq must know that Iraq is free. Free from United States occupation. I believe this will send a signal to the Sunnis to join the political process for the good of a "free" Iraq.

My plan calls:

To immediately redeploy U.S. troops consistent with the safety of U.S. forces.
To create a quick reaction force in the region.
To create an over- the- horizon presence of Marines.
To diplomatically pursue security and stability in Iraq

This war needs to be personalized. As I said before I have visited with the severely wounded of this war. They are suffering. . . . Because we in Congress are charged with sending our sons and daughters into battle, it is our responsibility, our OBLIGATION to speak out for them. That’s why I am speaking out. . . . Our military has done everything that has been asked of them, the U.S. can not accomplish anything further in Iraq militarily. IT IS TIME TO BRING THEM HOME.
. . . Read more!

posted by Lorenzo 7:38 PM

 
White Phosphorous: Chemical Weapon Used by U.S.
(Guardian Unlimited, November 17, 2005)
White phosphorus is a manufactured toxic and incendiary substance that catches fire when it reacts with oxygen. . . . Its military uses take advantage of its incendiary properties to provide smoke cover for troops, to identify targets (as a tracer) or to use it directly as an incendiary. . . . An account from US soldiers in the March 2005 issue of Field Artillery documents its use in "shake and bake" missions against insurgent positions in Falluja in November 2004, explaining how the white phosphorus would "flush out" enemy fighters who were then killed with high explosives. . . . The authors describe it as a "potent psychological weapon" against insurgents dug into trenches. Napalm-like white phosphorus, as military thinktank Global Security explains, can produce second or third degree burns on contact with skin that are "multiple, deep, and variable in size". It is said to burn to the bone.

Also see: Fallujah - the hidden massacre Photo gallery

The Pentagon has admitted white phosphorus was used at Falluja against insurgents. Protocol three of the 1980 Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons (CCCW) prohibits its use against civilians and military targets located within a concentration of civilians, but the US has only ratified protocols one and two. . . . Pentagon officials maintain that white phosphorus is not banned by any treaty that the US has signed, and cites its use to "flush out" enemy fighters as consistent with the principle of proportionality governing the use of all weapons. . . . The charge that it was used in an area with a high civilian concentration (the city of Falluja) remains the central controversy, regardless of the legal issues. . . . Claims that civilians were found burned to the bone had swirled around Falluja since the fighting, but were this month taken up by a documentary on the Italian television channel RAI. One former US solider, interviewed by director Sigfrido Ranucci said he saw "the burned bodies of women and children".

[NOTE: Those "claims" are backed up with photos, some of which may be viewed via the "See also" link above. But be warned, these are very graphic pictures.]
. . . Read more!

posted by Lorenzo 7:21 PM

 
Top Democrat urges Iraq pullout
(BBC NEWS, November 17, 2005)
An influential Democratic congressman - who voted for the Iraq invasion in 2003 - has called for the immediate withdrawal of US forces from Iraq. . . . John Murtha - a decorated Vietnam War veteran - said US troops had become "a catalyst for violence" in Iraq. . . . His comments followed attacks from the Bush administration on critics of its Iraq war policy and its handling of intelligence to invade Iraq. . . . "Our troops have become the primary target of the insurgency, they are united against US forces, and we have become a catalyst for violence," Mr Murtha said at an emotional news conference in Washington. . . . "US troops are the common enemy of the Sunnis, the Saddamists, and the foreign jihadists ... I believe we need to turn Iraq over to the Iraqis," he said. . . . Mr Murtha - who is a member of a key House of Representatives panel that oversees defence spending - urged the White House to "immediately redeploy US troops consistent with the safety of US forces". . . . The congressman from Pennsylvania also said a "quick reaction force" should be created in the Middle East. . . . Mr Murtha's remarks have dealt a further blow to the Bush administration's attempt to rally support for the war in Iraq, the BBC's Justin Webb in Washington says. . . . Until now comments the Troops Out movement in America has received support only on the political fringes, but that has changed in a dramatic fashion, our correspondent says.
. . . Read more!

posted by Lorenzo 1:03 PM

 
Sunnis Demand Probe of Torture Allegations
(Chris Tomlinson, Associated Press, November 16, 2005)
Iraq's main Sunni Arab political party on Wednesday demanded an international investigation into allegations that security forces illegally detained and tortured suspected insurgents at secret jails in Baghdad. . . . "Our information indicates that this is not the only place where torture is taking place," he said, reading an official party statement. The party "calls on the United Nations, the Arab League and humanitarian bodies to denounce these clear human rights violations, and we demand a fair, international probe so that all those who are involved in such practices will get their just punishment." . . . In a related development, at least four Iraqi policemen were treated at Yarmouk Hospital for injuries they said were suffered in beatings by men who identified themselves as Interior Ministry commandos after they were stopped Monday on patrol in the Dora neighborhood of southwest Baghdad. . . . An Associated Press photographer and an AP Television News cameraman saw long, thin black and blue bruises and welts on their backs and shoulders. . . . The men were visibly nervous and refused to speak in detail about their ordeal, fearing reprisals. They told AP journalists that they were blindfolded and taken to an unknown location . . . On Tuesday, Prime Minister Ibrahim al-Jaafari confirmed that more than 173 Interior Ministry prisoners were found malnourished and possibly tortured by government security forces at a Baghdad lockup Sunday. . . . Al-Jaafari's comments came a day after an Interior Ministry official said an investigation will be opened into allegations that its officers tortured suspects detained in connection with the insurgency. . . . Tariq al-Hashimi, the secretary-general of the Iraqi Islamic Party, held up photos of the bodies of people who appear to have been subjected to torture and said: "This is what your Sunni brothers are being subjected too." . . . He said his group had sent complaints in the past the government, but without response. . . . [Also see Government Accused of Death Squads in Iraq.] . . . He said that if the investigation proves that the interior minister was involved, then he should resign. He also said the country's top Shiite cleric, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, should "condemn these acts and stop covering" for the Shiite minister. . . . The U.N. Assistance Mission in Iraq issued a report Monday depicting a bleak picture of the Iraqi legal system. . . . "Massive security operations by the Iraqi police and Special Forces continue to disregard instructions announced in August 2005 by the Ministry of the Interior to safeguard individual guarantees during search and detention operations," the report said.
. . . Read more!

posted by Lorenzo 1:31 PM

 
U.S. Using Chemical Weapons on Iraqi Civilians
(Dahr Jamail, The Independent, 15 November 2005)
"They used these weird bombs that put up smoke like a mushroom cloud," he said. He had seen "pieces of these bombs explode into large fires that continued to burn on the skin even after people dumped water on the burns". . . . As an unembedded journalist, I spent hours talking to residents forced out of the city. A doctor from Fallujah working in Saqlawiyah, on the outskirts of Fallujah, described treating victims during the siege "who had their skin melted". . . . He asked to be referred to simply as Dr Ahmed because of fears of reprisals for speaking out. "The people and bodies I have seen were definitely hit by fire weapons and had no other shrapnel wounds," he said. . . . Burhan Fasa'a, a freelance cameraman working for the Lebanese Broadcasting Corporation (LBC), witnessed the first eight days of the fighting. "I saw cluster bombs everywhere and so many bodies that were burnt, dead with no bullets in them," he said. "So they definitely used fire weapons, especially in Jolan district." . . . Mr Fasa'a said that while he sold a few of his clips to Reuters, LBC would not show tapes he submitted to them. He had smuggled some tapes out of the city before his gear was taken from him by US soldiers. . . . Some saw what they thought were attempts by the military to conceal the use of incendiary shells. "The Americans were dropping some of the bodies into the Euphrates near Fallujah," said one ousted resident, Abdul Razaq Ismail. . . . Dr Ahmed, who worked in Fallujah until December 2004, said: "In the centre of the Jolan quarter they were removing entire homes which have been bombed . . . He said he saw bulldozers push soil into piles and load it on to trucks to carry away. In certain areas where the military used "special munitions" he said 200 sq m of soil was being removed from each blast site.
. . . Read more!

posted by Lorenzo 1:20 PM

 
U.S. Is Using WMDs on Iraqi Civilians
(Daily Times Monitor, November 09, 2005)
The United States dropped massive quantities of white phosphorus on the Iraqi city of Fallujah during the attack on the city in November 2004, killing insurgents and civilians with appalling burns that indicate this weapon was used, reported The Independent on Tuesday. . . . The newspaper's website said that photographs and videos and interviews with American soldiers who took part in the Fallujah attack provide graphic proof that phosphorus shells were widely deployed in the city as a weapon. . . . In a documentary to be broadcast by RAI, the Italian state broadcaster, on Tuesday morning, a former American soldier who fought at Fallujah says, "I heard the order to pay attention because they were going to use white phosphorus on Fallujah," reported The Independent. . . . "Phosphorus burns bodies, in fact it melts the flesh all the way down to the bone, I saw the burned bodies of women and children. Phosphorus explodes and forms a cloud. Anyone within a radius of 150 metres is done for." . . . The website said that photographs on RAI’s official website (www.rainews24.it) show exactly what the former soldier means. Provided by the Studies Centre of Human Rights in Fallujah, dozens of high-quality, colour close-ups show bodies of Fallujah residents, some still in their beds, whose clothes remain largely intact but whose skin has been dissolved or caramelised or turned the consistency of leather by the shells. . . . According to The Independent, Mohamad Tariq, a biologist in Fallujah interviewed by RAI for the film, said, "A rain of fire fell on the city, the people struck by this multi-coloured substance started to burn, we found people dead with strange wounds, the bodies burned but the clothes intact." . . . The documentary, entitled 'Fallujah: the Hidden Massacre', also claims that incendiary bombs known as Mark 77, a new, improved form of napalm, were used in the attack, in breach of the UN Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons of 1980.


Also see: ITALIAN TV ALLEGES U.S. USED CHEMICAL WEAPONS IN FALLUJAH
George W. Bush, the new HitlerThe evidence in 'Fallujah - the hidden massacre' claims to show the US forces did not use phosphorous in the legitimate way - to highlight enemy positions - but dropped the substance indiscriminately on the city, and on a massive scale. The documentary also shows the terrible damage wrought by the US bombardment of Fallujah, and the carnage to civilians, some of whom lay sleeping. . . . Equally disturbingly, a document in the report claims to prove that the U.S. forces have used the MK77 form of Napalm - the chemical used with devastating effect on civilians during the Vietnam war - on civilians in Iraq. . . . "I had gathered testimonials on the use of phosphorous and Napalm in Iraq from several refugees from Fallujah, and wanted to tell the world about it, but my kidnappers would not allow me to," said Italian journalist Giuliana Sgrena, held hostage in Iraq earlier this year, during the documentary. . . . The use of white phosophorous and Napalm is prohibited by UN conventions. Moroever, the United States signed up to the Chemical Weapons Convention in 1997. . . . American pilots dropped the controversial incendiary agent napalm on Iraqi troops during the advance on Baghdad. The attacks caused massive fireballs that obliterated several Iraqi positions. . . . The Pentagon denied using napalm at the time, but Marine pilots and their commanders have confirmed that they used an upgraded version of the weapon against dug-in positions. They said napalm, which has a distinctive smell, was used because of its psychological effect on an enemy. . . . At the time, the Pentagon insisted the report was untrue. "We completed destruction of our last batch of napalm on 4 April, 2001," it said. . . . The revelation that napalm was used in the war against Iraq, while the Pentagon denied it, has outraged opponents of the war. . . . "Most of the world understands that napalm and incendiaries are a horrible, horrible weapon," said Robert Musil, director of the organisation Physicians for Social Responsibility. "It takes up an awful lot of medical resources. It creates horrible wounds." Mr Musil said denial of its use "fits a pattern of deception [by the US administration]". . . . The Pentagon said it had not tried to deceive. It drew a distinction between traditional napalm, first invented in 1942, and the weapons dropped in Iraq, which it calls Mark 77 firebombs. They weigh 510lbs, and consist of 44lbs of polystyrene-like gel and 63 gallons of jet fuel. . . . Officials said that if journalists had asked about the firebombs their use would have been confirmed. A spokesman admitted they were "remarkably similar" to napalm but said they caused less environmental damage. . . . But John Pike, director of the military studies group GlobalSecurity.Org, said: "You can call it something other than napalm but it is still napalm. It has been reformulated in the sense that they now use a different petroleum distillate, but that is it. The US is the only country that has used napalm for a long time. I am not aware of any other country that uses it." Marines returning from Iraq chose to call the firebombs "napalm". . . . Mr Musil said the Pentagon's effort to draw a distinction between the weapons was outrageous. He said: "It's Orwellian. They do not want the public to know. It's a lie."
. . . Read more!

posted by Lorenzo 10:03 AM

 

US Forces 'Used Chemical Weapons' During Assault on City of Fallujah

Published on Tuesday, November 8, 2005 by the Independent / UK
by Peter Popham

Powerful new evidence emerged yesterday that the United States dropped massive quantities of white phosphorus on the Iraqi city of Fallujah during the attack on the city in November 2004, killing insurgents and civilians with the appalling burns that are the signature of this weapon. . . . Ever since the assault, which went unreported by any Western journalists, rumors have swirled that the Americans used chemical weapons on the city. . . . On 10 November last year, the Islam Online website wrote: "US troops are reportedly using chemical weapons and poisonous gas in its large-scale offensive on the Iraqi resistance bastion of Fallujah, a grim reminder of Saddam Hussein's alleged gassing of the Kurds in 1988." . . . The website quoted insurgent sources as saying: "The US occupation troops are gassing resistance fighters and confronting them with internationally banned chemical weapons." . . . In December the US government formally denied the reports, describing them as "widespread myths". "Some news accounts have claimed that US forces have used 'outlawed' phosphorus shells in Fallujah," the USinfo website said. "Phosphorus shells are not outlawed. US forces have used them very sparingly in Fallujah, for illumination purposes. . . . "They were fired into the air to illuminate enemy positions at night, not at enemy fighters." . . . But now new information has surfaced, including hideous photographs and videos and interviews with American soldiers who took part in the Fallujah attack, which provides graphic proof that phosphorus shells were widely deployed in the city as a weapon. . . . In a documentary to be broadcast by RAI, the Italian state broadcaster, this morning, a former American soldier who fought at Fallujah says: "I heard the order to pay attention because they were going to use white phosphorus on Fallujah. In military jargon it's known as Willy Pete. . . . "Phosphorus burns bodies, in fact it melts the flesh all the way down to the bone ... I saw the burned bodies of women and children. Phosphorus explodes and forms a cloud. Anyone within a radius of 150 meters is done for." . . . Photographs on the website of RaiTG24, the broadcaster's 24-hours news channel, www.rainews24.it, show exactly what the former soldier means. Provided by the Studies Centre of Human Rights in Fallujah, dozens of high-quality, colour close-ups show bodies of Fallujah residents, some still in their beds, whose clothes remain largely intact but whose skin has been dissolved or caramelised or turned the consistency of leather by the shells. . . . A biologist in Fallujah, Mohamad Tareq, interviewed for the film, says: "A rain of fire fell on the city, the people struck by this multi-coloured substance started to burn, we found people dead with strange wounds, the bodies burned but the clothes intact." . . . The documentary, entitled Fallujah: the Hidden Massacre, also provides what it claims is clinching evidence that incendiary bombs known as Mark 77, a new, improved form of napalm, was used in the attack on Fallujah, in breach of the UN Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons of 1980, which only allows its use against military targets. . . . Meanwhile, five US soldiers from the elite 75th Ranger Regiment have been charged with kicking and punching detainees in Iraq. . . . The news came as a suicide car bomber killed four American soldiers at a checkpoint south of Baghdad yesterday.
. . . Read more!

posted by JJW 7:52 PM

 
Operation "Steel Curtain"
(Dahr Jamail, Iraq Dispatches, November 07, 2005)
There is a huge US military operation once again targeting the Al-Qa’im area of Iraq, this one named "Steel Curtain." . . . As tomorrow marks the one year anniversary of the beginning of the massacre in Fallujah, the US military pushes on with house to house fighting in the small down of Husaybah, near Al-Qaim. . . . According to Al-Jazeera: "Falih Abd al-Karim, an Iraqi journalist, told Aljazeera that US and Iraqi forces were positioned in al-Sikak neighbourhood and north and south of 12 Rabia al-Awal neighbourhood in central Husaybah." . . . This came after US warplanes on Sunday evening targeted al-Jamahir, al-Risala and other neighbourhoods in the town, destroying houses, and killing and injuring dozens of people, he said. . . . The bodies remained under the debris of the houses because US forces do not allow burials or transfer of the injured to hospitals, Abd al-Karim added. . . . The US shelling has demolished government buildings, including al-Jamahir primary school, al-Qaim preparatory school for boys, the educational supervision building, al-Qaim post office and communication centre, al-Qaim education directorate and two mosques in the city, he said. . . . Once again, the effects of this on the civilian population are either under-reported or not reported at all in most mainstream outlets in the US. . . .
A young mother of six children, Ida Thiyab, was changing her baby’s diapers; she left her home when he was only one day old. Now he is two months. A third was looking for clean water to feed her baby. Soriya, a mother and grandmother of a big family, suffers from asthma, and in the refugee camp the doctor did not know how to help her. . . . "Is not it dangerous to go back home now, while the situation is still not safe?" (One of the biggest attacks eventually began on Nov 5, 2005 named Steel Curtain, 3,500 American and Iraqi troops participated in it) . . . "What else can we do?" replied Ida. "It is getting too cold especially at night in the wilderness; we were living in a (tent) that we made of flour sacks for two months." . . . In one of the cars a woman became very angry, she did not obey, began shouting at the soldiers: "I am a doctor, I am supposed to be at work now, while I spent the day here in these queues, why do not you respect our time, can not you see that we are civilians, how many times do you have to search us." . . . Traces of the last attack could be seen everywhere on the buildings, the faces, and the suspicious eyes. . . . We heard the same scenario. Water, electricity, phones, roads were all cut. The city was besieged before the bombing began on October 5, 2005 and went on for 18 days. Many houses were demolished; many families left to the refugee camps, many people were arrested, including the Moslem Scholars Association secretary in Haditha and his son. The general hospital was occupied for 10 days; the hospital director and one of the doctors were brutally beaten and then arrested for a week inside the hospital. Many schools and offices were still occupied. All houses were raided, some twice a day. All weapons were confiscated including the personal. There is no government, no offices, no schools, no work, no markets . . . nothing. "Haditha is a fallen city" was sarcastically repeated by residents. . . . Dr. Walid Al-Obeidi, the director of Haditha General Hospital and Dr. Jamil Abdul Jabbar, the only surgeon in the Haditha area were arrested for a week, very badly beaten and threatened to face the same treatment in the future by the American troops. . . . Dr. Jamil, a surgeon for 20 years, was also arrested and very brutally beaten. When we met him, 22 days later, his face was still bluish. His nose was broken, and a big opening in his head. He said: "They beat me on my eyes and nose, kicked me with boots under my chin. One of them threatened me if I do not talk after he counts to three, he would shoot me. He began counting, after three he turned the gun upside down and hit me on the back of my head by the gun. For days I could not move or see. They threatened us of abusing our families. For some reason they took my picture while I was bleeding, I could hear the camera click." . . . Both doctors were threatened if they do not talk, they would receive the same treatment in the future. They were warned of passing any information of the arrest to the media. They were asked who wrote the hostile slogans against the American on the opposite wall of the hospital (there were different slogans on that wall from opposite sides, the American soldiers –the F word- and the insurgents). "What are the names of the insurgents they treated," they asked, "And what are the pictures of the bodies in the hospital computer?" . . . Dr.Walid said he does not know who wrote on the wall outside the hospital, what the names of the insurgents are, because they were masked. He explained that the dead bodies' pictures were of unknown people whose bodies were found after the fighting. . . . He explained, "We can not keep these bodies forever; we do not have enough cold boxes. So, after two months, we take their pictures and bury them, so that whenever some one from their families comes to ask we show the pictures of the dead bodies." . . . An American officer asked Dr.Walid what he thinks of the Americans, and he replied "You are occupation troops. I wish that you were friends, but this way, things do not work." . . . "Is not it better that we are here," the officer asked again. . . . "No," Dr. Walid replied, "Look at you, heavily armed in your military clothes, you frighten children. You create tension." Dr. Walid was offered $30 as an apology compensation for beating and humiliating him. "I did not know what to do, I did not want to reject them and create more problems, and I could not accept them, so I gave them to the cleaning workers." One of the American soldiers whispered to Dr.Walid, that the compensation they should pay if such an aggression happen in the US, would buy the whole city of Haditha. . . . The troops are every where (in the hospital, the assistant room became the investigation room.) They occupy any house for 2 or 3 hours. You find them in the house garden or on the roofs at any time. They are occupying 8 schools now, the Education Office, the water project, the municipality, the court. . . . filling the windows with sand sacs, and turned them into headquarters. Many people whose belongings, money, documents . . . etc. were confiscated during the house raids, were given small sheets of paper saying that they can collect them in this or that school.
. . . Read more!

posted by Lorenzo 4:33 PM

 
Iraq prisoner abuse witnesses 'disappear' in US custody

(uruknet.info, news from occupied Iraq, November 4, 2005)
The star witness in the trial of US troops for prisoner abuse in Iraq and Afghanistan has mysteriously disappeared. Omar al-Farouq would have been the first detainee to testify against an American soldier. . . . The US regime previously claimed that Omar al-Farouq was a "top al-Qaeda operative" and "one of Osama bin Laden's top lieutenants", but now they claim that he was somehow able to escape. The only evidence of his escape is an anonymous "leak" to the mass media, as usual from an "unnamed" US official. . . . Three other witnesses are said to have "escaped" at the same time, so the only four people ever to succeed in an "escape" from a Guantanamo-bay-style maximum secitity US military prison all happen to be witnesses who wanted to testify against the US military. . . . There is sufficient anecdotal evidence here to justify asking the question: is the US military willing to eliminate people who threaten their position in occupied countries? Yet there is no hint of this obvious question in the western media. As previous examples demonstrate, the mass media would not be so restrained if the same incident happened in an enemy state.


SOURCE
Washington Post, "Pentagon: Top al-Qaida Operative Escaped", 1 November 2005.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/11
/01/AR2005110101423.html
FORT BLISS, Texas -- A man once considered a top al-Qaida operative escaped from a U.S.-run detention facility in Afghanistan and cannot testify against the soldier who allegedly mistreated him, a defense lawyer involved in a prison abuse case said Tuesday.
Omar al-Farouq was one of Osama bin Laden's top lieutenants in Southeast Asia until Indonesian authorities captured him in the summer of 2002 and turned him over to the United States.
A Pentagon official in Washington confirmed Tuesday evening that al-Farouq escaped from a U.S. detention facility in Bagram, Afghanistan, on July 10. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the information.
An Army lawyer for Sgt. Alan J. Driver, a reservist accused of abusing Bagram detainees, asked Tuesday where al-Farouq was and what the Army had done to find him in time for Driver's court proceedings.
Capt. John B. Parker, a prosecutor, said al-Farouq and three others escaped from the Bagram detention center and have not been found.
"If we find him ... we will make him available," Parker said [with a smirk on his face].
...


FURTHER READING
CBS News (AP), "Pentagon: Top al-Qaida Operative Escaped", 2 November 2005.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/11/02/ap/national/mainD8
DK2I300.shtml
A man once considered a top al-Qaida operative escaped from a U.S.-run detention facility in Afghanistan and cannot testify against the soldier who allegedly mistreated him, a defense lawyer involved in a prison abuse case said Tuesday.
Omar al-Farouq was one of Osama bin Laden's top lieutenants in Southeast Asia until Indonesian authorities captured him in the summer of 2002 and turned him over to the United States.
A Pentagon official in Washington confirmed Tuesday evening that al-Farouq escaped from a U.S. detention facility in Bagram, Afghanistan, on July 10. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the information.
An Army lawyer for Sgt. Alan J. Driver, a reservist accused of abusing Bagram detainees, asked Tuesday where al-Farouq was and what the Army had done to find him in time for Driver's court proceedings.
Capt. John B. Parker, a prosecutor, said al-Farouq and three others escaped from the Bagram detention center and have not been found.
"If we find him ... we will make him available," Parker said.
...
Al-Farouq could have been the first detainee to testify against a soldier in the Afghanistan prisoner abuse case.
...
. . . Read more!

posted by Lorenzo 1:55 PM


This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License.
Copyright © 2000 - 2005 by Lawrence Hagerty
Copyrights on material published on this website remain the property of their respective owners.

News    Palenque Norte     Changing Ages    Passionate Causes    dotNeters    Random Musings    Our Amazon Store    About Us